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About the Whites

Worshipped by some, hated by others, the legend of the White family started growing after the release of the cult documentary The Dancing Outlaw, which put the spotlight on eldest son Jesco and his love of mountain dancing, Elvis and huffing gasoline. The rest of the family remained in the shadows until The Wild and Wonderful Whites focused on the less celebrated members of the clan. Though the rest never learned the art of mountain dancing, they all share his talent to be alternately poetic, funny, and insanely self-destructive.

The film follows four generations of the family:

85-year-old Bertie Mae White, the matriarch of the family and widow of famed mountain dancer D. Ray White, gave birth to and adopted more children than she can recall. A good Christian woman, Bertie somehow managed to raise a whole generation of outlaws.

Bertie Mae's Children:

Mamie, Jesco, Bo, Poney and Sue Bob grew up living life as it had been in the hills for hundreds of years - they drew water from a well, raised their own animals and lived without indoor plumbing. Faced with few choices besides a life of poverty or in the coal mines, they rebelled against the area's lack of opportunity by choosing a life of challenging the law and "partying their balls off." Only Poney left Boone County to find legitimate work as a house painter in Minnesota.

Bertie Mae's Grandchildren:

Mamie's daughter Mousie, Bo's children Kirk and Derek, and Sue Bob's son Brandon – are even more extreme in their wild ways. Whereas their parents mostly engaged in smaller crimes, the third generation became more openly violent and addicted to the suddenly readily available prescription drugs.

Bertie Mae's Great-grandchildren-:

Mousie's daughter Cheyan, Derek's young son Derek Jr. and Kirk's children Tylor and baby Monica are the future of the White clan. What the future holds for this generation is one of the interesting questions audiences leave the screening debating.

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